During the debate, many MEPs criticised Churchill and expressed deep reservations about Kanta and support for Poland, 25 of whom tabled an amendment against the agreement. [22] With regard to Poland, Woalta`s report adds that “the provisional government should be required to hold free and unlimited elections based on general elections and by secret ballot as soon as possible.” [18] The agreement could not mask the importance of short-term pro-Soviet government control of Lublin and eliminate language calling for supervised elections. [19] By this time, the Soviet army had fully occupied Poland, holding much of Eastern Europe with military power three times greater than that of Allied forces in the West. [Citation required] The declaration of liberated Europe did little to dispel the sphere of influence agreements that had been incorporated into the ceasefire agreements. The agreement invited the signatories to “consult each other on the measures necessary for the fulfilment of the common responsibilities defined in this Declaration”. During the discussions in Gleichalta, Molotov added language that weakened the effects of the implementation of the declaration. [19] The first reaction to the Von Yalta accords was solemn. . . .